Core Drillings, 2011

n.b.k. (Neuer Berliner Kunstverein), Berlin
Wastepaper from 5 offices of the Neuer Berliner Kunstverein, 5 holes in the floor of the offices / in the ceiling of the exhibition space
Holes each Ø 30 cm
Photo © Jens Ziehe, 2011

Core Drillings, 2011

n.b.k. (Neuer Berliner Kunstverein), Berlin
Wastepaper from 5 offices of the Neuer Berliner Kunstverein, 5 holes in the floor of the offices / in the ceiling of the exhibition space
Holes each Ø 30 cm
Photo © Jens Ziehe, 2011

Core Drillings, 2011

n.b.k. (Neuer Berliner Kunstverein), Berlin
Wastepaper from 5 offices of the Neuer Berliner Kunstverein, 5 holes in the floor of the offices / in the ceiling of the exhibition space
Holes each Ø 30 cm
Photo © Stefan Alber, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2014

Core Drillings, 2011

n.b.k. (Neuer Berliner Kunstverein), Berlin
Wastepaper from 5 offices of the Neuer Berliner Kunstverein, 5 holes in the floor of the offices / in the ceiling of the exhibition space
Holes each Ø 30 cm
Photo © Jens Ziehe, 2011

Core Drillings, 2011

n.b.k. (Neuer Berliner Kunstverein), Berlin
Wastepaper from 5 offices of the Neuer Berliner Kunstverein, 5 holes in the floor of the offices / in the ceiling of the exhibition space
Holes each Ø 30 cm
Photo © Jens Ziehe, 2011

Core Drillings, 2011

n.b.k. (Neuer Berliner Kunstverein), Berlin
Wastepaper from 5 offices of the Neuer Berliner Kunstverein, 5 holes in the floor of the offices / in the ceiling of the exhibition space
Holes each Ø 30 cm
Photo © Stefan Alber, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2014

Kernbohrungen

since 2011

Through the ceiling of the exhibition space, which is the floor of the n.b.k. offices above, Karin Sander had 30-centimeter-wide holes drilled in the places where the wastepaper baskets are usually located. The holes replace the wastepaper baskets, and visibly link administrative practice with the practice of exhibition. Karin Sander captures the everyday gesture of disposal by instructing the n.b.k. employees to ignore the fact that the wastepaper baskets are missing.
In this way, material that has become useless falls from the administration offices to the exhibition space, and is transformed by way of the shift of context into a constantly growing temporary sculpture. The falling paper – as a metonymic sign of everyday life – becomes an object of the exhibit. This open concept of sculpture shows Karin Sander’s approach, which can be described here as the “brute” transformation of a found situation. [...] She takes recourse to things already present in the system and that can turn the system against itself. The relations between inside and outside, between an institution and the city space are made legible and displayed in their ambivalence.

From the press release “Karin Sander”, Neuer Berliner Kunstverein, Berlin, 2011